International Helath Humanities Network: Reports by Keywords

Selected Healthcare Area: wellbeing

Rhythm for Life: Music Making and Wellbeing Enhancement for Older Adults

The Rhythm for Life project has aimed to enhance wellbeing among older adults through the implementation and evaluation of creative music making initiatives. Run from the Royal College of Music’s (RCM) Centre for Performance Science, the project facilitated music learning opportunities for over 100 adults between 2010 and 2012, all of which were delivered by specially-trained and supported RCM students. Adult learners, aged 50 years and over, participated in free 10-week programmes designed for musical beginners, including one-to-one instrumental lessons in learners’ homes, small-group instrumental lessons in community spaces, and large-group creative music workshops. 

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'Performing Bedside for Children in Hospital'

Bedside Theatre for hosptialiszed children is a 2 year practice-based research developed within Newman University Drama Department, CADLab. It is being undertaken at Birmingham Children's Hospital, NHS Trust, on the impact of bedside theatre performance on hospitalised children's well-being. It examines the process of creating theatre for children who suffer from cancer and cardiac problems, connecting with the hospital and working within the hospital tight routines, dealing with ethics, working with theatre artists and performing to children bedside. It also reports on evidence collected by questionnaire and interviews about the perceived benefits of bedside theatre by children and their parent/carers. Evidence shows that Bedside Theatre can help children relax and hold hospital stress such as pre and post operative anxiety more lightly. It distracts children's mind from their illness and gives them something to discuss with their families. Theatre can do more than entertainment in hospital as it comforts children and their parents. Parents of children in the cancer ward appreciate Bedside Theatre as most suitable to the needs of the patients.

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Theatre for Children in Hospital. The Gift of Compassion.

I am delighted to share the news about the recent publication of my new book 'Theatre for Children in Hospital. The Gift of Compassion" (Intellect, December 15th 2016) with the IHHN members. The book presents a 5-year theatre research study with children and their families in hospitals in W. Midlands in the U.K. Detailed examples of everyday artistic practice in hospital, vibrant dialogues between children as audiences and actors as visitors in the medical world, incidents of breath-taking theatrical experiences in children's wards (paediatrics, cardiac, oncology and intensive care units) and, evidence of the impact of bedside theatre on child emotional and social wellbeing during their stay in hospital make this book unique. Now that I am reading it, I feel that I have been truthful to myself while writing it. I also feel that I represent the truths of my actors, volunteers and audiences, including children, their families, nursing staff and arts managers in hospitals. Of course, I may be biased and therefore, I would love to hear from you, the readers, about your impressions, views, and opinions. My contact is p.sextou@newman.ac.uk 

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  • Arts & Humanities Research Council
  • The  institue of mental health nottingham
  • National Institute of Health
  • Centre for Advanced Studies
  • The University of Nottingham United Kingdom China Malaysia
  • De Montfort University Leicester
  • OPPNET Basic Behaviour & Social Science Opportunity Network